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MWA ʻ13 Artist Hike

East Maui Watershed Partnership invites artists of all ages and abilities from Maui County to help raise awareness on the beauty and importance of our native ecosystems. Malama Wao Akua meaning realm of the Gods is East Maui Watershed Partnership’s annual juried art exhibition that showcases Maui Nui’s native species and the folks who work to protect them. Receiving for artwork will be start September 22nd. Subject matter must be a native species.

Not familiar with Maui's Native Species? Come journey with us into Maui’s Native forest and end up immersed in a place that is the same as it was before the arrival of humans to this island.

The Boardwalk Hike weaves its way into an almost 100% Native Hawaiian forest filled with ‘Olapa, Koa, ‘Ōhi‘a, and Native Honeycreepers all around. Hike is 3mi roundtrip with about 600ft elevation change with part of the hike on a raised boardwalk trail. Hike is from 9am-2pm. Space is limited and some transportation is available from Pukalani.

Please contact EMWP to SIGN UP and for info!
(808)573-6999
info@eastmauiwatershed.org

Go to our website for full exhibition details, entry forms, along with a calendar of events full of other opportunities to learn about native species to Maui Nui at www.eastmauiwatershed.org.

Start Date: 6/13/2013

Time: 9am

End Date: 6/13/2013

Time: 2pm

West Maui Mountains Watershed Partnership Field Assistant wanted

WMMWP FIELD ASSISTANT

Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit

I. SUMMARY OF DUTIES: Regular, Full-Time, RCUH Non-Civil Service position with the Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit (PCSU), West Maui Mountains Watershed Partnership (WMMWP), located in Wailuku/Lahaina Districts with offices in Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii. Continuation of employment is dependent upon program/operational needs, satisfactory work performance, availability of funds, and compliance with applicable Federal/State laws.

Serves as a field crew member building and maintaining fence lines, controlling feral animal populations, locating and controlling alien plant invasions using mechanical and chemical means, and monitoring native vegetation/ecosystem recovery. Work will focus on the protection of the native Hawaiian forest and related water resources within the approximately 50,000 acres of forested watershed in the West Maui Mountains. Majority of the work will be performed in remote locations and will require the ability to backpack up to twelve (12) miles over rough terrain or thick unmarked trail conditions with loads up to fifty (50) pounds, camp out in remote areas under extreme conditions for up to a week at a time. Fieldwork requires working with herbicides, working in and around helicopters, and occasional rappelling. Records detailed field data and spatial information and inputs data into Global Positioning System (GPS) and computer systems. Maintains field equipment, tracks supply inventories, and assists with public relations activities.

II. SCOPE OF POSITION:

A. Reports To: Principal Investigator (Clifford Morden)
WMMWP Coordinator (Chris Brosius)
WMMWP Field Supervisor (John Comcowich)

B. Supervises: None.

C. Budgetary and/or Fiscal Responsibilities: None.

D. Signature Authorities: None.

E. Levels of Interaction: Supervised by the WMMWP Field Supervisor and the Watershed Coordinator who provides goals, direction and will delegate responsibility for project completion. Occasional assignments will be supervised by other WMMWP partners. Will eventually work independently on routine assignments. Work must be in accordance with the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii (RCUH) and PCSU policies, management guidelines, herbicide requirements, and endangered species legislation, and is evaluated on safety, effective progress and quality of work. Person-to-person contacts are primarily with supervisors, field crew leaders, coworkers and occasionally with partnership members, landowners, and local community members. Work will be primarily in remote field areas and requires camping in remote rainforest locations for up to five consecutive days, two to four (2-4) times a month in inclement weather. Must be able to work and live in close quarters in remote locations successfully with fellow field crew members. Must not be acrophobic due to the need to fly by helicopter to remote locations and hiking on or near vertical exposures. Contribute to creating and preserving a positive work environment. Good communication skills are essential. Field work may involve elevation changes up to 5,788 feet in a day. Fieldwork requires the ability to drive project vehicles both on and off road; and within the scope of training, do occasional rappelling, work in and around helicopters, and handle pesticides.

III. MAJOR DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES (List 6-8 duties in order of importance, not by % values. Place a 1 to identify the Essential Job Functions) BOLD all “primary duties” :

40% 11. Fence Monitoring, Construction and Repair. Serves as field crew member on fence construction, inspections and maintenance program. Performs fence maintenance and repairs following monthly schedules. Prepares fence inspection reports and may enter data into computer. Examines and evaluates problem fence sections for possible reconstruction. Assists in new fence line determination using compass or Global Positioning System (GPS) equipment.

30% 12. Feral Animal Control. Serves as field crew member in WMMWP feral animal removal projects. Removes feral pigs, deer, and goats using approved methods. Monitors animal transects and remote activity recording stations. Records data on animal sign, location, control effort, captures, ages and sexes and enters data into GPS equipment and computer.

15% 13. Alien Plant Control. Serves as field crew member in field operations of WMMWP alien plant identification, monitoring and control program. Systematically locates and maps target species. Controls alien plants using mechanical and chemical techniques. Records data including number of plants treated in size classes, location, amount of chemical used, and inputs field data into GPS equipment and computer.

5% 14. Native Species Monitoring. Assists with identifying and locating rare species. May assist in restoration efforts. Records data on species locations and status and inputs data into GPS equipment and computer.

10% 15. Performs basic construction and maintenance tasks under supervision of Field Supervisor and Coordinator. Attends training to gain or maintain skills in safe use of firearms, helicopters, pesticides, and basic first aid and CPR. Assists with other field, resource monitoring, and public relations activities as assigned. Maintains field equipment and notifies supervisors when repairs or maintenance are required. Assists with tracking inventory of supplies and equipment.

06. Performs other duties as assigned.

IV. PRIMARY QUALIFICATIONS:

A. Education: High School Diploma or G.E.D. equivalent.

B. Experience: Up to one (0-1) year of experience in field activities related to Natural Resource Management.

C. Knowledge: Knowledge of native Hawaiian flora and fauna and threats from alien species.

D. Abilities and Skills: Ability to operate power tools including chain saws, weed eaters, generators, chipper, etc. Ability to communicate orally and in writing and to comprehend complex verbal and written instructions. Ability to use a compass and other navigation tools and to read and navigate with topographic maps and aerial photos. Must possess a valid driver’s license and be able to drive a 4-wheel drive vehicle with manual transmission.

Post Offer/Employment Conditions: Must possess the American Red Cross Certification in First Aid/CPR (or be able to obtain the certificate following the training provided within three (3) months of hire. Must be able to complete basic helicopter safety course within six (6) months of hire and rappelling training within twelve (12) months of hire. Must be able to pass a criminal background check and obtain National Rifle Association or National Park Service and State of Hawaii Hunter Safety Program firearms certification. As a condition of employment, all certifications must be obtained and maintained as specified by the certificating agency.

E. Physical and/or Medical Demands: Ability to hike and camp in remote areas and rugged terrain under inclement weather conditions, up to five (5) consecutive days. Able to backpack and lift and carry fifty (50) pounds.

V. SECONDARY QUALIFICATIONS: Field work with emphasis on feral animal and alien plant control with a land management agency. Previous fence building or construction experience. Familiarity with computers, data entry, and use of Global Positioning System (GPS) units. Experience working in and around helicopters and using herbicides to control weedy vegetation. Rappelling experience. College courses or degree in Natural Sciences. Possess valid State of Hawaii Hunting License.

9th Annual Juried Art Exhibition Malama Wao Akua 2013

East Maui Watershed Partnership & Viewpoints Gallery in Makawao is working together to raise awareness on the beauty and importance of our native ecosystems. Malama Wao Akua meaning realm of the Gods is in its 9th annual exhibition. This juried art exhibition showcases Maui Nui’s native species and the folks who work to protect them. All artwork is created by local Maui artists. On display at Viewpoints Gallery 10am-6pm daily.

Opening Night is Friday September 27th
Jurors Walk thought at 4:00pm
Blessing and Awards to follow at 5:00pm
Free to the public

Start Date: 09/25/2013

Time: 10am

End Date: 10/23/2013

Time: 6pm

West Maui Mountains Watershed Partnership – Field Assistant

WMMWP FIELD ASSISTANT

Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit

I. SUMMARY OF DUTIES: Regular, Full-Time, RCUH Non-Civil Service position with the Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit (PCSU), West Maui Mountains Watershed Partnership (WMMWP), located in Wailuku/Lahaina Districts with offices in Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii. Continuation of employment is dependent upon program/operational needs, satisfactory work performance, availability of funds, and compliance with applicable Federal/State laws.

Serves as a field crew member building and maintaining fence lines, controlling feral animal populations, locating and controlling alien plant invasions using mechanical and chemical means, and monitoring native vegetation/ecosystem recovery. Work will focus on the protection of the native Hawaiian forest and related water resources within the approximately 50,000 acres of forested watershed in the West Maui Mountains. Majority of the work will be performed in remote locations and will require the ability to backpack up to twelve (12) miles over rough terrain or thick unmarked trail conditions with loads up to fifty (50) pounds, camp out in remote areas under extreme conditions for up to a week at a time. Fieldwork requires working with herbicides, working in and around helicopters, and occasional rappelling. Records detailed field data and spatial information and inputs data into Global Positioning System (GPS) and computer systems. Maintains field equipment, tracks supply inventories, and assists with public relations activities.

II. SCOPE OF POSITION:

A. Reports To: Principal Investigator (Clifford Morden)
WMMWP Coordinator (Chris Brosius)
WMMWP Field Supervisor (John Comcowich)

B. Supervises: None.

C. Budgetary and/or Fiscal Responsibilities: None.

D. Signature Authorities: None.

E. Levels of Interaction: Supervised by the WMMWP Field Supervisor and the Watershed Coordinator who provides goals, direction and will delegate responsibility for project completion. Occasional assignments will be supervised by other WMMWP partners. Will eventually work independently on routine assignments. Work must be in accordance with the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii (RCUH) and PCSU policies, management guidelines, herbicide requirements, and endangered species legislation, and is evaluated on safety, effective progress and quality of work. Person-to-person contacts are primarily with supervisors, field crew leaders, coworkers and occasionally with partnership members, landowners, and local community members. Work will be primarily in remote field areas and requires camping in remote rainforest locations for up to five consecutive days, two to four (2-4) times a month in inclement weather. Must be able to work and live in close quarters in remote locations successfully with fellow field crew members. Must not be acrophobic due to the need to fly by helicopter to remote locations and hiking on or near vertical exposures. Contribute to creating and preserving a positive work environment. Good communication skills are essential. Field work may involve elevation changes up to 5,788 feet in a day. Fieldwork requires the ability to drive project vehicles both on and off road; and within the scope of training, do occasional rappelling, work in and around helicopters, and handle pesticides.

III. MAJOR DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES (List 6-8 duties in order of importance, not by % values. Place a 1 to identify the Essential Job Functions) BOLD all “primary duties” :

40% 11. Fence Monitoring, Construction and Repair. Serves as field crew member on fence construction, inspections and maintenance program. Performs fence maintenance and repairs following monthly schedules. Prepares fence inspection reports and may enter data into computer. Examines and evaluates problem fence sections for possible reconstruction. Assists in new fence line determination using compass or Global Positioning System (GPS) equipment.

30% 12. Feral Animal Control. Serves as field crew member in WMMWP feral animal removal projects. Removes feral pigs, deer, and goats using approved methods. Monitors animal transects and remote activity recording stations. Records data on animal sign, location, control effort, captures, ages and sexes and enters data into GPS equipment and computer.

15% 13. Alien Plant Control. Serves as field crew member in field operations of WMMWP alien plant identification, monitoring and control program. Systematically locates and maps target species. Controls alien plants using mechanical and chemical techniques. Records data including number of plants treated in size classes, location, amount of chemical used, and inputs field data into GPS equipment and computer.

5% 14. Native Species Monitoring. Assists with identifying and locating rare species. May assist in restoration efforts. Records data on species locations and status and inputs data into GPS equipment and computer.

10% 15. Performs basic construction and maintenance tasks under supervision of Field Supervisor and Coordinator. Attends training to gain or maintain skills in safe use of firearms, helicopters, pesticides, and basic first aid and CPR. Assists with other field, resource monitoring, and public relations activities as assigned. Maintains field equipment and notifies supervisors when repairs or maintenance are required. Assists with tracking inventory of supplies and equipment.

06. Performs other duties as assigned.

IV. PRIMARY QUALIFICATIONS:

A. Education: High School Diploma or G.E.D. equivalent.

B. Experience: Up to one (0-1) year of experience in field activities related to Natural Resource Management.

C. Knowledge: Knowledge of native Hawaiian flora and fauna and threats from alien species.

D. Abilities and Skills: Ability to operate power tools including chain saws, weed eaters, generators, chipper, etc. Ability to communicate orally and in writing and to comprehend complex verbal and written instructions. Ability to use a compass and other navigation tools and to read and navigate with topographic maps and aerial photos. Must possess a valid driver’s license and be able to drive a 4-wheel drive vehicle with manual transmission.

Post Offer/Employment Conditions: Must possess the American Red Cross Certification in First Aid/CPR (or be able to obtain the certificate following the training provided within three (3) months of hire. Must be able to complete basic helicopter safety course within six (6) months of hire and rappelling training within twelve (12) months of hire. Must be able to pass a criminal background check and obtain National Rifle Association or National Park Service and State of Hawaii Hunter Safety Program firearms certification. As a condition of employment, all certifications must be obtained and maintained as specified by the certificating agency.

E. Physical and/or Medical Demands: Ability to hike and camp in remote areas and rugged terrain under inclement weather conditions, up to five (5) consecutive days. Able to backpack and lift and carry fifty (50) pounds.

V. SECONDARY QUALIFICATIONS: Field work with emphasis on feral animal and alien plant control with a land management agency. Previous fence building or construction experience. Familiarity with computers, data entry, and use of Global Positioning System (GPS) units. Experience working in and around helicopters and using herbicides to control weedy vegetation. Rappelling experience. College courses or degree in Natural Sciences. Possess valid State of Hawaii Hunting License.

VI. REVIEWED BY INCUMBENT OF POSITION: This position description is a summary of essential job functions, responsibilities and qualifications. These designations of essential job functions are subject to change as needs dictate.

______________________________ _______________
Signature of Incumbent Date

______________________________
Print Name

JOB DESCRIPTION REVIEWED WITH THE INCUMBENT:

_____________________________________ ________________
Signature of Supervisor Date
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: This sheet is attached to the position description. This page will be maintained with your file copy of the official installation date of the position description.

PREPARED/RECOMMENDED AND SUBMITTED BY:

________________________________________ ____________________
Principal Investigator Date

CLASSIFICATION:
Non-Exempt
RCUH Pay Range: PR-N11
SLOT POINTS
KNOW HOW CI1 87

SLOT POINTS
ACCOUNTABILITY B(1)R 19

SLOT Percent POINTS
PROBLEM SOLVING B1 12% 10

***********************************************************************************************
APPROVED BY:

_____________________________________ __________________
Director of Human Resources or Designee Date

ATTACHMENT 1
Completed by: Christina Yan

Bulletin Board Posting 04/30/13:
RCUH Website 04/30/13:

WMMWP FIELD ASSISTANT – ID# 13272. Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit. Regular, Full-Time, RCUH Non-Civil Service position with the Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit (PCSU), West Maui Mountains Watershed Partnership (WMMWP), located in Wailuku/Lahaina Districts with offices in Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii. Continuation of employment is dependent upon program/operational needs, satisfactory work performance, availability of funds, and compliance with applicable Federal/State laws. MONTHLY SALARY RANGE: $1,664-$2,582/Mon. DUTIES: Serves as a field crew member building and maintaining fence lines, controlling feral animal populations, locating and controlling alien plant invasions using mechanical and chemical means, and monitoring native vegetation/ecosystem recovery. Work will focus on the protection of the native Hawaiian forest and related water resources within the approximately 50,000 acres of forested watershed in the West Maui Mountains. Majority of the work will be performed in remote locations and will require the ability to backpack up to twelve (12) miles over rough terrain or thick unmarked trail conditions with loads up to fifty (50) pounds, camp out in remote areas under extreme conditions for up to a week at a time. Fieldwork requires working with herbicides, working in and around helicopters, and occasional rappelling. Records detailed field data and spatial information and inputs data into Global Positioning System (GPS) and computer systems. Maintains field equipment, tracks supply inventories, and assists with public relations activities. PRIMARY QUALIFICATIONS: EDUCATION: High School Diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. EXPERIENCE: Up to one (0-1) year of experience in field activities related to Natural Resource Management. ABIL/KNOW/SKILLS: Knowledge of native Hawaiian flora and fauna and threats from alien species. Ability to operate power tools including chain saws, weed eaters, generators, chipper, etc. Ability to communicate orally and in writing and to comprehend complex verbal and written instructions. Ability to use a compass and other navigation tools and to read and navigate with topographic maps and aerial photos. Must possess a valid driver’s license and be able to drive a 4-wheel drive vehicle with manual transmission. Post Offer/Employment Conditions: Must possess the American Red Cross Certification in First Aid/CPR (or be able to obtain the certificate following the training provided within three (3) months of hire. Must be able to complete basic helicopter safety course within six (6) months of hire and rappelling training within twelve (12) months of hire. Must be able to pass a criminal background check and obtain National Rifle Association or National Park Service and State of Hawaii Hunter Safety Program firearms certification. As a condition of employment, all certifications must be obtained and maintained as specified by the certificating agency. PHYSICAL/MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS: Ability to hike and camp in remote areas and rugged terrain under inclement weather conditions, up to five (5) consecutive days. Able to backpack and lift and carry fifty (50) pounds. SECONDARY QUALIFICATIONS: Field work with emphasis on feral animal and alien plant control with a land management agency. Previous fence building or construction experience. Familiarity with computers, data entry, and use of Global Positioning System (GPS) units. Experience working in and around helicopters and using herbicides to control weedy vegetation. Rappelling experience. College courses or degree in Natural Sciences. Possess valid State of Hawaii Hunting License. INQUIRIES: Chris Brosius 661-6600 (Maui). APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: Please go to www.rcuh.com, click on “Employment”; select “Apply” and navigate to “See Job Announcements and/or Apply for a Job.” You must submit the following documents online to be considered for the position: 1) Cover Letter, 2) Resume, 3) Salary History, 4) Supervisory References, 5) Copy of Degree(s)/Transcript(s)/Certificate(s). All online applications must be submitted/received by the closing date (11:59 P.M. Hawaii Standard Time/RCUH receipt time) as stated on the job posting. If you do not have access to our system and the closing date is imminent, you may send additional documents to rcuhhr@rcuh.com. If you have questions on the application process and/or need assistance, please call (808)956-8344. CLOSING DATE: May 20, 2013. EEO/AA Employer.

Hawaiian Taro Sale at Maui Nui Botanical Gardens

Attention taro farmers and enthusiasts! Maui Nui Botanical Gardens will hold a Hawaiian Taro Sale on Friday, June 7th, at 9am! Rare potted taro varieties from the ‘Ele‘ele, Mana, Lehua, Manini, Lauloa, Piko, and ‘Ula‘ula families will be available for purchase from 9am until sold out. The Gardens may not have these varieties available until next year, so get them on June 7th! Maui Nui Botanical Gardens is located at 150 Kanaloa Avenue, in Kahului. Call 249-2798 for more information.

Start Date: Friday, June 7th, 2013

Time: 9:00am

End Date: Friday, June 7th, 2013

Time: 4:00pm

Moku’auia Island (Goat Island) Restoration Service Trip

Saturday, June 8th from 8am – 1pm

Join the Hawaii Audubon Society to spend the day off the coast of Malaekahana Beach Park removing invasive species and planting natives to restore habitat for nesting seabirds.

We will be walking to Goat Island from shore, so please wear reef safe shoes and clothing.

Please RSVP to hiaudsoc@pixi.com or call 808-528-1432.

Start Date: Saturday, June 8th, 2013

Time: 8:00 am

End Date: Saturday, June 8th, 2013

Time: 1:00 pm

MWA ʻ13 Artists Hike

East Maui Watershed Partnership invites artists of all ages and abilities from Maui County to help raise awareness on the beauty and importance of our native ecosystems. Malama Wao Akua meaning realm of the Gods is East Maui Watershed Partnership’s annual juried art exhibition that showcases Maui Nui’s native species and the folks who work to protect them. Receiving for artwork will be start September 22nd. Subject matter must be a native species.

Not familiar with Maui's Native Species? Come journey with us into Maui’s Native forest and end up immersed in a place that is the same as it was before the arrival of humans to this island.

The Bird Loop Hike descends into Waikamoi gulch with great native bird viewing. The gulch is dominate with a variety of native vegetation like ʻAmaʻu Ferns,ʻŌhiʻa, and Kūpaoa. Hike is 1.25mi roundtrip with about 450ft elevation change. Hike is from 9am-12pm. . Space is limited and some transportation is available from Pukalani.

Please contact EMWP to SIGN UP and for info!
(808)573-6999
info@eastmauiwatershed.org

Go to our website for full exhibition details, entry forms, along with a calendar of events full of other opportunities to learn about native species to Maui Nui at www.eastmauiwatershed.org.

Start Date: 7/14/2013

Time: 9am

End Date: 7/14/2013

Time: 12pm

2013 HAWAI‘I CONSERVATION CONFERENCE: SUBMISSIONS DUE MONDAY, JANUARY 21!!!

Join us in celebrating the 21st annual Hawai‘i Conservation Conference July 16-18 in Honolulu, Hawai‘i. If you are interested in sustaining our natural resources for current and future generations, come share your topic of expertise with the conservation community in Hawai‘i and the wider Pacific Region. The Hawai‘i Conservation Alliance requests your session proposals and abstracts for the 2013 Hawai‘i Conservation Conference by Monday, January 21.

Session proposals and abstracts must be submitted online at: https://hawaii.conference-services.net/authorlogin.asp?conferenceID=3464&language=en-uk

NOTE THE FOLLOWING CHANGE TO PREVIOUS YEARS:

BOTH session proposals and individual abstracts are due January 21.

Final revisions are due March 15.

See the official call on our website: http://hawaiiconservation.org/activities/hawaii_conservation_conference/conferences/2013/call_for_proposals

 

If you have any questions, please contact 808-687-6152 or coordinator@hawaiiconservation.org

Hawaii Conservation Conference Announces Exciting Lineup of Entertainment and Activities for Public Day

Organizers invite everyone to join in the celebration of conservation through art, music and film on August 1, featuring local favorite, Anuhea

July 12, 2012, Honolulu – Malama Hawaii announced today Anuhea as its featured performer at the Hawaii Conservation Conference’s Public Day on August 1, 2012, a part of the annual conference attended by Hawaii’s leading conservation specialists, scientists and public officials. The public is invited to a festival of arts, music, film and conservation at the Hawaii Convention Center offering interactive programs and live entertainment focusing on issues of preserving and protecting our environment.

Activities on the public day on August 1, 2012 will take place from 3pm – 8pm and include interactive exhibits and Maoli Real Time Gallery, a live mural-painting by Wyland, Aupuni Place native art demonstrations, and Knowledge In Motion conservation through film showings, food and musical performances by Anuhea and Kawika Kahaiapo of Kaukahi.

“As we celebrate our 20th year, we are looking to cultivate the next generation of conservationists in Hawaii,” stated Lihla Noori, Hawaii Conservation Alliance Executive Director. “That’s why we are inviting everyone to join us, as work to protect our Hawaii as one community, in a fun, inspirational, and creative atmosphere on August first.”

2012 marks the 20th anniversary of the annual Hawaii Conservation Conference (HCC) and 20 years since the Rio Earth Summit. The 20th annual conference is an opportunity to reflect on the past two decades of island conservation in Hawaii and wider Pacific Islands.

The entire community is invited to join the Hawaii Conservation Alliance at The Hawaii Convention Center for a day filled with activities for the whole family also including My Hawaii Student Award, poster contest winners, and the first-ever Hawaii Energy Conservation Award. The Award will mark the first time the Annual Hawaii Conservation Conference will honor the role of energy conservation in terms of the role it plays as part of the comprehensive effort to protect Hawaii’s environment.

The Hawaii Energy Conservation Award will honor an individual or organization whose outstanding leadership and innovation in the area of energy conservation has made a positive impact on the health and well-being of our state. Energy conservation does more than save money and natural resources, by reducing the need for imported oil it reduces the impact on Hawaii’s fragile environment and increases the sustainability of our state economy.

For more information, visit HawaiiConservation.Org.

For updates on the conference and public day - LIKE the Hawaii Conservation Alliance on Facebook.

About the Hawaii Conservation Conference

The 20th Annual Hawaii Conservation Conference is an event brought to the community by the Hawaii Conservation Alliance, a collaborative coalition of 19 government, education and non-profit leaders responsible for managing the biodiversity of Hawaii’s lands and waters. The conference is the largest gathering of people actively involved in the protection and management of Hawaii’s natural environment.

 

For more information contact:

Kristin Jackson

kristin@jacksonink.net

WAIKIKI BEACH NOURISHMENT PROJECT SUCCESSFULLY RESTORES ICONIC BEACH

 

HONOLULU -- The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) has successfully completed a four-month project that widened and elevated approximately 1,730 feet of Waikiki Beach, from the west end of the Kuhio Beach swim basin, near the Duke Kahanamoku statue, to the existing Royal Hawaiian groin. In some areas where tides once lapped at walls, there is now up to 40 feet of new sand.

“The Waikiki Beach Nourishment Project is a prime example of a successful public and private partnership that will have far-reaching benefits for local users and our visitors,” said Governor Neil Abercrombie. “The project has significantly improved Waikiki Beach, for the preservation of one of Hawai‘i’s most iconic and heavily utilized shorelines.”

The project received financial support from DLNR’s Beach Fund, the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority (HTA), and Kyo-ya Hotels and Resorts, LP. Additional stakeholders included the Waikiki Improvement Association; other Waikiki Beach hotels, including the Outrigger Waikiki on the Beach, Hyatt Regency, Waikiki Beach Marriott, Pacific Beach Hotel, and Aston Waikiki Beach; the City and County of Honolulu Department of Parks and Recreation and Ocean Safety Division; the beach concessions; the Waikiki Neighborhood Board; and the state Department of Health.

“We are happy to demonstrate that we are capable of recycling original sand and renourishing Waikiki Beach in an environmentally sensitive manner, said William J. Aila, Jr., DLNR chairperson. “This project met its goals with a small amount of disruption for a project of this size. This successful completion is due to the strong and sustained collaborative efforts of all the stakeholders who were closely involved throughout the project. Over the next few decades, regular maintenance will be necessary to prolong the life of this treasured beach, and we will look to many partners to support these steps.”

Placement of sand on the last stretch of beach in front of the Outrigger Hotel to the Royal Hawaiian Hotel was completed April 25, on schedule. Lead contractor Healy Tibbitts Builders, Inc., then completed removal of equipment and restoration of the staging area at the ‘Ewa basin of Kuhio beach.

Mike McCartney, president and CEO of HTA, said: “Waikiki Beach is a landmark for our visitor industry and for our residents. We would like to extend a mahalo to everyone involved and affected during the work, and look forward to everyone continuing to enjoy Waikiki Beach.”

Rick Egged, president of the Waikiki Improvement Association, added: “The members of the association are very pleased. The number one past complaint of our visitors has been that the beach is overcrowded, and we now have 37 feet more beach than we had in January. Beach restoration and maintenance projects are essential if we are to preserve the $2 billion dollar a year asset that is Waikiki Beach.

DLNR worked with the state Department of Health, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Coastal Zone Management Program, NOAA-National Marine Fisheries and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to ensure the project met all state and federal requirements for environmental quality control. DLNR also held numerous meetings with city and state agencies, community organizations, businesses and visitor industry representatives to review the plans and maintain an open dialogue on the project’s progress.

Sam Lemmo, administrator of the DLNR Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands, which managed the project, said: “This was a very complicated project that required patience and cooperation from many different stakeholders. The project performance will be monitored for several years and will include profiling and estimation of beach volume by the University of Hawai‘i. They will also be conducting benthic monitoring of offshore Waikiki areas.”

For information about the project, go to the DLNR Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands web site at http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/occl/.

# # #

Before and after project photos available at https://picasaweb.google.com/101613020396360217549/WaikikiBeachSandReplenishmentProjectSpring2012#

For more information news media may contact:

Deborah Ward

DLNR Public Information Specialist

Phone: (808) 587-0320

 

www.hawaii.gov/dlnr www.facebook.com/HawaiiDLNR www.twitter.com/dlnr

Project details box;

The sand replenishment project involved:

Recovery of 24,000 cubic yards of sand from recovery areas located 1,500 to 3,000 feet offshore of the project area in a water depth of about 10 to 20 feet

The project’s objective was to return the beach to its 1985 width.

Pumping sand to an onshore dewatering site within the Diamond Head swim basin

Placement of sand according to design beach profiles to ensure the right amount of sand is located in the correct sections of beach

Removal of two deteriorated groin structures

Offshore environmental and water quality monitoring

Beach and nearshore sediment monitoring

 

Project requirements:

60-day operating window of calm seas

Mild south shore wind and wave conditions, in winter

Sand recovery from offshore deposits began January 23

Sand hauling began the week of March 12.

 

Project method:

Hydraulic suction dredge barge retrieved high quality sand from underwater offshore deposits

Dewatering basin allowed sand to dry before placement

Trucks hauled and placed sand during weekday morning hours; no hauling took place in afternoons

Safety corridor on the beach established so people could safely cross to the ocean and back.

Weekday morning sand hauling allowed continued public use of the beach while maintaining project objectives.

© 2014 Mālama Hawaii