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9th Annual Juried Art Exhibition Malama Wao Akua 2013

East Maui Watershed Partnership & Viewpoints Gallery in Makawao is working together to raise awareness on the beauty and importance of our native ecosystems. Malama Wao Akua meaning realm of the Gods is in its 9th annual exhibition. This juried art exhibition showcases Maui Nui’s native species and the folks who work to protect them. All artwork is created by local Maui artists. On display at Viewpoints Gallery 10am-6pm daily.

Opening Night is Friday September 27th
Jurors Walk thought at 4:00pm
Blessing and Awards to follow at 5:00pm
Free to the public

Start Date: 09/25/2013

Time: 10am

End Date: 10/23/2013

Time: 6pm

Hawaiian Taro Sale at Maui Nui Botanical Gardens

Attention taro farmers and enthusiasts! Maui Nui Botanical Gardens will hold a Hawaiian Taro Sale on Friday, June 7th, at 9am! Rare potted taro varieties from the ‘Ele‘ele, Mana, Lehua, Manini, Lauloa, Piko, and ‘Ula‘ula families will be available for purchase from 9am until sold out. The Gardens may not have these varieties available until next year, so get them on June 7th! Maui Nui Botanical Gardens is located at 150 Kanaloa Avenue, in Kahului. Call 249-2798 for more information.

Start Date: Friday, June 7th, 2013

Time: 9:00am

End Date: Friday, June 7th, 2013

Time: 4:00pm

Empowering Families with Lomilomi

LomiLomi

Saturday, December 1st

9:00am-12

At Ilima at Leihano: 891 Kamaaha Ave, Kapolei

Cost: $10 per person or $25 for families of up to 3 people

 

Today in our busy world and the many modern technology distractions and stresses of life, families seek to maintain balance physically, mentally and spiritually.

This workshop will offer an overview on traditional Hawaiian perspectives and practices of maintaining balance with lomilomi as applied to life today. You will learn simple stretches, hands on - seated lomilomi and the use of modern day tools that will help improve your everyday health and well being. Presenter Chris Mileka Robins has over twenty years of experience in body work and is a practitioner, educator, and presenter of lomilomi and ho’oponopono.

Registration is required.

Families are encouraged to attend together (limit 3ppl per family group).

To register, please go to www.malamalearningcenter.org

 

If you have any questions, please contact us by email:

janice@malamalearningcenter.org or by phone: 542-9107.

 

Mahalo

--

Janice Staab

Education Coordinator

Mālama Learning Center

www.malamalearningcenter.org

(808) 542-9107

Malama Hawaii to honor Kenneth and Joan Brown

Malama Hawaii honor Kenneth and Joan Brown with The Kenneth Brown Malama Hawaii Award.

Kenneth Brown who with Pinky Thompson, were the inspirational founders of Maˉlama Hawai‘i, a coalition of organizations and individuals committed to the vision that Hawai‘i, our special island home, is a place where the land and sea are cared for, and communities are healthy and safe for all people.

For more on this inspiring leader, and extraordinary Hawaiian Son, read "Tapping the Source" in this week's Honolulu Weekly.

Tapping the Source

(excerpt) Beginning with the Hawaiian cultural renaissance in 1978, Kenneth Francis Brown, a middle-aged executive who is one-fourth Hawaiian but passed for pure haole, reclaimed his identity as a native son and forged a working plan for a sustainable future based on traditional mores.

Because it was in his nature and, some say, his kuleana as a descendant of alii to pursue the common good, Kenny Brown’s voyage of self-discovery grew into a series of cooperative enterprises that, for more than 40 years, have worked to protect Hawaii’s natural and cultural resources and to restore community health.

BY MINDY PENNYBACKER | MAR 7, 2012

Remarks by Senator Kenneth F. Brown

Before the Seminar Titled
"The Spectrum of Influences Affecting Quality Growth" July 25, 1973

Buy Local for the holidays

E Makahiki no!—greetings during this time of gratitude,

These are times of winds, rain, clouds, growth and change. I hoping that you and your loved ones are well during these times.

I am writing you to ask for your support. Native Books/Nā Mea Hawai‘i is going through its own period of change and attempting to “puka through” as a stronger community resource and presence—plans include continuing to showcase locally made products, art, books and educational materials about Hawai‘i as well as workforce development and training, raw material processing for cultural use, continued support and development of the growing Native Hawaiian creative arts and industries movement, community workshops, classes, and projects that widen our community skill sets for surviving the times ahead.

If you have gifts that you are purchasing this season, we would love to be considered as a place where you might find a few special items…. The store is filled with ONLY made on Kaua‘i,O‘ahu, Ni‘ihau, Moloka‘i, Hawai‘i Island and Maui gifts, clothing, food and all kinds of unusual items. We also have all the latest books and DVDs, and a rare and out of print book section. We think of ourselves as a “native knowledge center.”

If you haven’t been to the store in a while, please try to make a stop. We are open 7 days a week, 10a to 9p, Sundays until 6p. If you want to come earlier than 10, call or email me, we’re always in the store by 7:30a. If you haven’t been to Nā Mea Hawai‘i, its at the ‘ewa end of Ward Warehouse, under the Old Spaghetti Factory, corner of Ala Moana and Ward Avenue, lots of free parking and old style “main street Honolulu” atmosphere…great local food if you’re feeling ono for Chinese, Japanese, American, local, or Korean, and we have always been a pet friendly place.

We exist because you care, community cares, and we are so grateful. If you would like to support our continued existence, the time would be now.

 

Nui mahalo kākou a pau—we have each other to thank for the best work that we do, when we do it together.

with humility and gratitude, maile meyer

 

Maile Meyer

Native Books/Na Mea Hawai'i

Ward Warehouse, 'ewa end

808.783.2786

www.nativebookshawaii.com

 

MOANA NUI: PACIFIC PEOPLES, LANDS AND ECONOMIES

http://moananui2011.org/

MOANA NUI: PACIFIC PEOPLES, LANDS AND ECONOMIES

[ NOVEMBER 9-11, 2011 HONOLULU, HAWAII]

The Asia-Pacific region; nations of the Pacific rim which include Australia and the American and Asian nations, including Pacific Island nations are an increasing focus of geopolitical competition and economic stresses. Struggles for national sovereignty and cultural viability bring about rapidly expanding campaigns toward economic self-sufficiency. These campaigns challenge the legacies of colonialism, continued militarism in the region, growing trade and development conflicts, and corresponding environmental degradations. Whose interests are advanced in these struggles? Whose views are served? What are the dominant economic interests in play? How do we take control of our future? Which is the best way forward—convergence or resistance?... The timing of this conference is intended to overlap the next meeting of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) in Honolulu, and hopes to call public attention to the critical importance of maintaining sound and productive local economies in the Pacific Islands both for their own sake and food security in the world.*

 

HAWAI‘I’S LEGACY LAND CONSERVATION PROGRAM SEEKS APPLICANTS FOR LAND ACQUISITION FUNDING

 

HONOLULU – The Department of Land and Natural Resources’ (DLNR) Legacy Land Conservation Program (LLCP) is seeking applicants for grants from the State Land Conservation Fund to fund the protection, through acquisition, of lands having value as a resource to the State of Hawai‘i.

The Legacy Land Conservation Program provides an annual source of funding for the acquisition and conservation of watersheds; coastal areas, beaches, and ocean access; habitat protection; cultural and historic sites; recreational and public hunting areas; parks; natural areas; agricultural production; and open spaces and scenic resources.

State agencies, county agencies, and non-profit land conservation organizations may apply. Proposed projects may include acquisition of fee title or conservation easements. County agencies and non-profit project applicants must be able to provide at least 25 percent of the total project costs.

“Legacy Land helps protect natural, cultural, and agricultural resources by either transferring full ownership of land to an agency or nonprofit organization that can protect the resources, or placing a conservation easement on the property to ensure that the owner will always protect those resources,” stated DLNR Chairperson William J. Aila, Jr.

“The program brings federal matching funds to Hawai‘i and provides an incentive to local agencies and organizations working to protect the watersheds and agricultural lands that sustain Hawai‘i’s food security, and the cultural and recreational resources important to the education and health of our children,” Aila said.

The 2011-2012 application cycle may provide approximately $4.5 million in grants, awarded through a competitive process and subject to any budget restrictions. Ten percent of the State’s land conveyance tax is set aside annually in the Land Conservation Fund for the purpose of protecting Hawai‘i’s unique and valuable resource lands. Project applications will be reviewed by the Legacy Land Conservation Commission, which will nominate projects for funding.

Projects are subject to the approval of the Board of Land and Natural Resources, consultation with the Senate President and Speaker of the House of Representatives, review by the Department of the Attorney General and the approval of the Governor. Final awards are subject to the availability of funds.

Earlier this year, the Board of Land and Natural Resources approved and Governor Abercrombie authorized approximately $4.45 million from the Land Conservation Fund for four projects to acquire and protect properties that have value as natural, agricultural and cultural resources to the State. The release of these State funds helped secure approximately $7.59 million in matching federal, county, and private funds toward the protection of these lands.

Since its inception in 2006, the Legacy Land Conservation Program has awarded funds for the protection of approximately 7,900 acres of lands having natural, cultural, and agricultural resource value, leveraging an average of two matching federal, private, and county dollars for every State dollar spent.

Starting July 29, 2011 the 2011-2012 LLCP Grant Application and instructions are available at http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/dofaw/llcp. Applications must be received no later than 4:30 p.m. on September 16, 2011.

For more information on the Legacy Land Conservation Program, please visit

http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/dofaw/llcp or call (808) 586-0921.

 

# # #

News in brief: State and county agencies, and non-profit land conservation organizations may now apply for grants from the State Land Conservation Fund to acquire and protect lands having rare or important resources. Funding can be used for conservation of watersheds; coastal areas, beaches, and ocean access; habitat protection; cultural and historic sites and much more. For information, contact the Legacy Land Conservation Program at 586-0921.

For more information, media may contact:

 

Molly Schmidt

LLCP Program Coordinator

Phone: (808) 586-0921

Molly.e.schmidt@hawaii.gov

 

Deborah Ward

DLNR Public information specialist

Phone: (808) 587-0320

 

Sent by:

Laura A Stevens

Education and Outreach Coordinator

Office of the Chairperson

Department of Land and Natural Resources

Kalanimoku Bldg. Rm. 131

1151 Punchbowl St.

Honolulu, HI 96813

Phone: (808) 587-0320

Fax: (808) 587-0390

 

FOUR GRANTS AWARDED TO PROTECT LEGACY LANDS

 

The Department of Land and Natural Resources’ Legacy Land Conservation Program will award four grants to nonprofit organizations and county agencies for the protection of lands having important cultural, natural, and agricultural resources.

“During a time when we are focused on the current economy, it is important to also remember our responsibility to future generations and the sustainability of Hawaii’s agricultural, natural, and cultural heritage,” stated William J. Aila, Jr., DLNR chairperson.

The total amount of $4.45 million in State funding will secure approximately $7.6 million in matching federal, county, and private funding towards securing the protection of these lands.

The Legacy Land Conservation Commission, a nine-member commission composed of cultural, agricultural and natural resource experts and representatives from each county, advised the Board of Land and Natural Resources on this year’s project selections. Governor Neil Abercrombie released funding for the Commission’s recommended projects in late April.

“When private lands having such valuable public resources become available for sale, it is key to do what we can to protect them – sometimes these opportunities do not come again for decades, if ever,” stated Commission Chair Dale Bonar.

The approved project awards were made to:

County of Hawaii for Kaiholena, in North Kohala, Island of Hawai‘i, at $1,650,000 for the acquisition of 76.55 acres, to protect of open space, cultural and archeological sites, and coastal resources;

Livable Hawai‘i Kai Hui for the Hāwea Heiau Complex and Keawāwa Wetland in Honolulu, Island of O‘ahu, at $325,000 for the purchase of five acres to preserve native bird habitat, wetlands, and cultural sites;

Maika‘i Kamakani ‘O Kohala for Kauhola Point in North Kohala, Island of Hawai‘i, at $975,000 for the acquisition of 27.546 acres, to preserve cultural sites, recreational areas, and coastal lands; and

Trust for Public Land and North Shore Community Land Trust for Turtle Bay Mauka Lands in Ko‘olauloa, Island of O‘ahu, at $1,500,000 for a conservation easement over 469 acres, to protect productive agricultural lands.

LLCP projects are subject to a consultation process with the Senate President and the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the approval of the Governor. Grant funding for projects that protect lands having value as a resource to the State is awarded through the Legacy Land Conservation Program on an annual basis, subject to the availability of funds.

For more information on the Legacy Land Conservation Program please visit

http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/dofaw/llcp or call (808) 586-0921.

 

# # #

 

 

For more information, media may contact:

 

Molly Schmidt

LLCP Program Coordinator

Phone: (808) 586-0921

Molly.e.schmidt@hawaii.gov

 

Deborah Ward

DLNR Public information specialist

Phone: (808) 587-0320

 

Hawaiian Hall Inspires Imagination

by Janice Staab for Mālama Hawai‘i

The newly re-opened Hawaiian Hall at the Bishop Museum is a mix of Hawaiian culture, old stories and legends, creative art, and surprisingly new and interactive technology. I remember visiting the Hawaiian Hall on school field trips with my hands held tightly behind my back, listening to our docent, reading captions, and staring in awe at the hanging whale and the hale pili. The only things that seemed familiar after visiting now are the whale and the hale pili.

Each of the three floors in the new hall has a different theme and all of the floors use touch screens and videos to help educate visitors. For example, the newly restored hale pili now has a monitor in front of it where one can see archival images of the original hale, learn about the building elements, witness its reconstruction, and even touch the screen to see images of each layer. There are also interactive screens where visitors can follow along and play an ipu or ‘uli‘uli, see how an imu is prepared, or watch a video about the political history of Hawai‘i from the perspective of a Hawaiian.

This new technology gives people an opportunity to become engaged in learning about Hawaiian culture. Instead of just a series of archived photos and cultural replicas, the new hall provides an "experience" for the visitors. The artwork of Hawaii’s natural environment covering the walls and even hanging from the ceiling makes the visit very real and enforces the theme of a culture connected to the land that is still very much alive and growing.

The new Hawaiian Hall draws you in through the combinations of art, archival images, videos, and interactive monitors and games. There was even a hula demonstration taking place while I was visiting where children and visitors could learn songs and play instruments with instructors. This visit was not what I would describe as a typical museum experience. It was a place that demonstrated the Hawaiian culture’s connection to the land and sea, and most of all showed that this culture is still very much alive and growing.

If you’re interested in supporting the Hawaiian Hall, there are opportunities to become docents and share knowledge with visitors. A great way to support the Bishop Museum is also to become a member.

To learn more about how to become involved please visit: www.bishopmuseum.org.

Hawaiian Cultural Resources

Saying Hawaiian Words
The Program to Preserve Hawaiian Place Names has presented this session each month since 1974, helping the public become familiar with Hawaiian word structure, pronunciation, and usage. Liliha Library (Honolulu), 1515 Liliha St. First Tuesdays of each month, 6 pm. Free. Call 808-587-7577 for more information.

Kamehameha Schools Distance Learning
High school students in public and private schools throughout the state who are interested in learning about Hawaiian culture can do so now through a special program offered by Kamehameha Schools’ Virtual Strategies & Distance Learning Branch.

The ‘Ike Hawai’i Distance Learning Program offers a series of online courses integrated with field trip experiences that focus on Hawaiian culture. There are currently five courses available ranging from Hawaiian Culture and English with a focus on Hawaiian Pacific Literature, to a four-part Kumu Lecture Series that incorporates multiple subjects with a Hawaiian focus. The first Kumu Lecture Series course provides students with the opportunity to interact and learn about the Hawaiian value malama (to care for, take care of) from a variety of perspectives.

For detailed course descriptions, please visit http://ksdl.ksbe.edu/ikehawaii. Students who complete these courses may qualify for a semester course credit with their school. For students who complete a total of eight courses (four Kumu Lecture Series courses and four by choice) will be awarded an ‘Ike Hawai‘i Distance Learning Certificate.

For more information about the ‘Ike Hawai‘i Distance Learning Program, visit http://ksdl.ksbe.edu/ikehawaii or call Josie Torricer at 842-8877. To request an application, please call the Admissions Office at 842-8800. The deadline to apply for the fall term is May 15, 2006 with classes beginning on July 27, 2006 and ending on December 15, 2006.

Ka Wana Hawaiian language booklet series
The new Ka Wana series of booklets is available from the University of Hawai‘i's Curriculum Research & Development Group. It is written by cultural specialist Malcolm Naea Chun, designed to assist parents, teachers, students and staff in their study and modern-day application of Hawaiian customs and traditions. The booklets were developed through Pihana Na Mamo, the state Department of Education's special-education project, for which Chun is the scholar in residence. To order, call 956-4969 or e-mail crdg@hawaii.edu.

Kapa Workshops on O`ahu
Ka`ala Farms in Wai`anae is hosting kapa making workshops on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Fee is $20 or do volunteer service at Ka'ala Learning Center.

Please contact Jody at (808) 696-4954 for more information.

Mahi`ai (Kalo Farming) A.A.S. Degree
Hawai`i Community College offers an Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree in kalo farming. The two-year Mahi`ai A.A.S. provides knowledge of the traditional and technical aspects of growing kalo, to perpetuate the cultural practices surrounding kalo cultivation and harvesting. Substantial coursework will be in the field, and students will be mentored by recognized practitioners.

Contact: I Ola Haloa Project, Hawai`i Community College, 200 W. Kawili Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Phone (808) 974-7486.

Hula A.A.S. Degree
Hawai`i Community College offers an Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree in Hula. The two-year Hula A.A.S. enhances the practice of hula in the community and halau hula (hula school), to perpetuate the cultural practices surrounding traditional dance. Students will acquire skills in ancient and secular hula. Students will gain experience in performing and marketing hula. Substantial coursework will be in the community and students will be mentored by recognized Hula practitioners.

Contact: I Ola Haloa Project, Hawai`i Community College, 200 W. Kawili Street, Hilo, HI 96720. Phone (808) 974-7486.

Diversity Workshops
The Environmental Education and Training Partnership (EETAP) is offering a limited number of professional development diversity workshops for environmental educators. The workshops offer an opportunity to explore multicultural issues as they occur in the real world of environmental education. Through discussion of one or more cases participants will explore the intersection of EE and cultural diversity and identify steps that can be taken to make one's own organization and program more inclusive and culturally diverse. For more information, please contact Gus Medina (gmedina@istar.ca or 905.468.8031) or visit:

http://www.eetap.org/media/pdf/CasesWorkshopAnnouncement.pdf

© 2014 Mālama Hawaii